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Resistance to Change

March 9, 2009 in Paul's Blog Tags: , ,

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In my personal life, I really hate change.  This is strange for someone who has made their living by embracing new technology.  My problem with change is that it takes so much of my time.

For example, I have been thinking about changing computer operating systems lately to get access to new applications and features on my home computer.  Yet I cringe when I remember how long it took to customize things just the way I like them.  That means files and commands being in predictable places, and having that old, familiar feeling.  (Like walking around the old neighborhood and knowing exactly where everything is and with no wasted motion.)

But perhaps I delude myself. Historically, premeditated change has almost always brought me positive benefits. I know this and yet I still resist change. Human nature I suppose.

I have lived in 5 states and moved within them several times.  I have gained a variety of invaluable tools and learned from those experiences. It didn’t take much time for me to become comfortable.  In fact, I enjoyed the spirit of adventure and discovery once I took the leap. So why do I cautiously approach change?  Again, I plead, a victim of human nature-sticking with the tried and true, but in business this can be deadly.  .

Business is fiercely competitive, so, in business, I am hungry for ways to gain efficiencies, become cleverer, and improve my final results With fewer projects to bid these days, this has never been more important.  Your competitors are racing to acquire these new tools.  Surviving in these challenges times requires adopting new technology.  Technology is a great asset to leverage that competitive edge.

Machine control has been around long enough to have demonstrated certifiable benefits and reliability. There are numerous success stories with fantastic increases in production and profitability reported. With the economy in slow motion, it would be a great time to investigate the technology and prepare your company for the future.  If you don’t, maybe your competitors will.  You may not look forward to the growing pains that change brings but you may not mind the change in your bottom line.

In future columns, I will write in greater detail about the right time to embrace and implement new technology. The game is always changing and so should you.

-Paul


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